Art Screen Workshop

I am teaching students how to program interactive art in a new series of free workshops called Art Screen Workshop. They will be taught a Sunday every month April through July at Cambridge Community Television (CCTV) in Central Square, Cambridge. At the end of the workshop student works will be displayed on a public interactive screen at CCTV.

Description

Learn how to program interactive art in this single session five-hour workshop! No prior programming, art or design experience is required. You will work in small teams to design, build and publish new digital artworks. We will teach the basics of programming and give you the specific skills required to design for the screen. Examples of works include narrative stories, proximity sensing words and designs, abstract digital mirrors, gestural games, motion sensing animations, beautiful designs responding to the presence of people, time of day, weather and more. By the end of the day, teams and individuals will have created one or more works of art to be installed publicly on a new interactive screen at CCTV.

drawing of person interacting with screen

abstract tree

pedestrian walking past screen

processing source code

andrew pointing at projection

Collaborative Design and Creative Expression with Arduino Microcontrollers (MIT IAP 2017)

light touch game prototype
I co-led a workshop about designing, building, and prototyping electronics devices and experiences during MIT’s IAP with Kyle Keane, Mark Vrablic and Abhinav Gandhi. No previous experience with programming or electronics was required. Topics covered included micro-controller programming using Arduino, collaborative software development using GitHub, solder-less electronics prototyping, electronic sensors, rapid prototyping, and small team management. Sponsored by MIT-SUTD Collaboration, Materials Science and Engineering and Craig Carter, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering.

Long Projects

Short Projects

Description

9-day hands-on workshop about collaboration, design, and electronics prototyping. No previous experience with computer programming or electronics is required. Beginning students will be taught everything they need to know and advanced students will be challenged to learn new skills. Participants will work in small teams to design and build electronics projects using open-source microprocessors. Team projects are completely open-ended and designed by participants, past projects have included: an internet-connected weather simulation station, a giant LED billboard, and a CNC drawing machine. Participants will complete three guided projects in order to learn the fundamentals and will then break into small teams to complete a one-day mini-project of their choosing. After the mini-project, participants will break into new teams that will each get $250 and four days to design, plan, and build a custom project of their choice. On the last day of the course, students will present their projects in public exhibition and have the chance to win a prize for crowd favorite. Participants will learn about microcontroller programming using Arduino, collaborative software development using GitHub, solderless electronics prototyping, electronic sensors, rapid prototyping, and small team management.

Learn to Build Your Own Video-game with the Unity Game Engine and Microsoft Kinect (MIT IAP 2017)

student showing bowling game

I co-led a workshop about designing, building, and publishing simple educational video-games during MIT’s IAP with Kyle Keane, Mark Vrablic and Abhinav Gandhi. No previous experience with computer programming or video-game design was required. Topics covered included collaboration, video game design, Unity programming, gesture handling using the Microsoft Kinect, 3D digital object creation and small team management. Sponsored by MIT-SUTD Collaboration, Materials Science and Engineering and Craig Carter, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering.

Long Project Videos

Description

9-day hands-on workshop about designing, building, and publishing simple educational video-games. No previous experience with computer programming or video-game design is required. Beginning students will be taught everything they need to know, and advanced students will be challenged to learn new skills. Participants will work in small teams to design, build, and publish video-games that will be shared in a large public exhibition. Team projects are open-ended and designed by participants. Examples include: a collection of bouncing balls that can be sped up or slowed down using hand gestures, a virtual reality laboratory where kids can perform experiments, and crowdsourcing interface for describing scientific graphics for blind students. Participants will complete guided projects in order to learn the fundamentals and will then break into small teams to complete a one-day mini-project of their choosing. Participants will then break into new teams that will have four days to design, plan, and build a custom project of their choice. On the last day, students will present their projects in a public exhibition and have the chance to win a prize for “crowd favorite”. Participants will learn about video-game creation using the Unity game engine, collaborative software development using GitHub, gesture handling using the Microsoft Kinect, 3D digital object creation, video-game design, and small team management.

 

Artist Talk: The Art of Composition or: How I Learned To Stop Programming and Love the UNIX Pipe

I gave an artist talk titled “The Art of Composition or: How I Learned To Stop Programming and Love the UNIX Pipe” on Thursday October 27, 2016 for the MassArt Professional and Continuing Education Thursday Night Lecture Series. I weaved together a short explanation and demonstration of UNIX pipes together with programming, art, composition and my artistic practice.

Slides (PDF ~5mb)

Artist Talk (Work, Inspiration, Code & Scratch) —2016

I gave an artist talk about my work, inspirations and programming for Sejal Patel’s Teaching in New Media course. This was followed by a brief introduction and workshop on the Scratch programming language.

Slides from the talk: Artist Talk Slides (13mb PDF).

Additional Resources

Sejal Patel’s Teaching in New Media Course Description

This course covers issues of teaching art in new media through project-based inquiry. Students evaluate the roles of multiple media and technology for existing art curriculum and develop projects that support the physical art making experience. Most classes will be structured as a combination of lectures, conversations, visits to maker labs, research and studio time. The final project for the class will be the development of an interdisciplinary unit or curriculum with supporting materials.

Coding Dynamic Experiences

Learn how to articulate and communicate your ideas through the medium of software code. Topics include culture & technology, social networks, design as social practice, and data visualization.

I developed the course Coding Dynamic Experiences for the MassArt Continuing Education department in the Summer of 2015. The course is designed to teach the fundamentals of programming in the context of designed interactive experiences. Course website summer 2015.

Student Work Samples (Summer 2015)

abstract shapes

Raphael Weikart, Assignment #1

rug tile pattern

Ginnie Hsu, Assignment #1

abstract shapes red black

Clapperton Mavhunga, Assignment #1

abstract shapes, still life

Sejal Patel, Assignment #1